STUDY: Adults who share household with children LESS likely to get Covid?

Researchers in Scotland observed 300,000 healthcare workers and determined that those living with young children ages 0-11 were significantly less likely to contract coronavirus and possibly were also less likely to be hospitalized. This is yet another study that is contrary to the doom and gloom narrative of Dr Fauci, Joe Biden, and the Great Reset technocrats who want to force us to take the Covid-19 vaccine or else remain in Lockdown Life forever. However the evidence is the evidence and we preset it to you here for your consideration. In this article, we’ll provide a the Study Abstract, a link to the full study, and also analysis of the study too.


STUDY: Sharing a household with children and risk of COVID-19: a study of over 300,000 adults living in healthcare worker households in Scotland

Published in medRxiv Journal Sept 2020

Abstract

  • Background: Children are relatively protected from novel coronavirus infection (COVID-19). The reasons for this protection are not well understood but differences in the immune response to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have been implicated. If such differences are due to differential exposure to non-SARS-CoV-2 infectious agents, adults who are close contacts of children may partly share in this protection. Such a protective effect would have important implications for the lives of children, not least in terms of schooling.
  • Methods Using a Scotland-wide record-linkage based occupational cohort comprising healthcare workers and members of their households, we examined whether sharing a household with young children (aged 0 to 11) attenuated the risk of hospitalisation with COVID-19, and/or testing positive for COVID-19 infection of any severity (any case of Covid-19). All healthcare workers directly employed by the National health Service (NHS) in Scotland, or contracted to provide general practice services, were included. Outcome and covariate data were obtained via linkage to Scotland-wide microbiology, drug prescribing, hospitalisation and death data.
  • Results 241,266 adults did not share a household with young children; 41,198, 23,783 and 3,850 shared a household with 1, 2 and 3 or more young children respectively. The risk of hospitalisation with COVID-19 was lower in those with one child and lower still in those with two or more children, adjusting for age the hazard ratio (HR) was 0.83 per child (95% CI 0.70-0.99). On additionally adjusting for sex, socioeconomic deprivation, occupation, professional role, staff/non-staff status, the number of adults and adolescents in each household, and comorbidity, the HR was 0.89 per child (95% CI 0.74-1.06). An association of the same magnitude, but more precisely estimated, was obtained for any case of COVID-19 (fully adjusted model, HR per child 0.89; 95% CI 0.84-0.95).
  • Conclusion Increased household exposure to young children was associated with an attenuated risk of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 and appeared to also be associated with an attenuated risk of COVID-19 disease severe enough to require hospitalisation.

Link to the FULL article:

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.09.21.20196428v1.full.pdf


Analysis: Study shows adults with more exposure to children may have decreased risk of coronavirus infection

Andrew Mark Miller of WashingtonExaminer.com wrote the following analysis…

A new study of healthcare workers in Scotland suggests that adults who are around schoolchildren are less likely to contract the coronavirus.

“Background Children are relatively protected from novel coronavirus infection (COVID-19),” the study’s abstract reads. “The reasons for this protection are not well understood but differences in the immune response to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have been implicated. If such differences are due to differential exposure to non-SARS-CoV-2 infectious agents, adults who are close contacts of children may partly share in this protection.”

The study, published Tuesday on the pre-peer-review website medRxiv, observed 300,000 Scottish healthcare workers and determined that those living with young children ages 0-11 were significantly less likely to contract coronavirus and possibly were also less likely to be hospitalized. Moreover, it found that the risk of hospitalization with COVID-19 was lower in adults who shared a house with one child, yet “lower still in those with two or more children.”

The study comes as nations across the world grapple with the decision of whether or not to send children back to school, with many fearing that children will spread the virus to their families at home, which this study appears to contradict.

“Such a protective effect would have important implications for the lives of children, not least in terms of schooling,” the study adds.

“If differential exposure to infectious agents is an important mechanism [in protecting children], adults who are close contacts of children, such as childcare providers, teachers, and parents may also benefit,” it continues. “If exposure to children was found to be protective, rather than harmful, this would have important implications for policy. Few studies, however, have examined this question.”

A study out of Germany examining the “association of contact to small children with mild course of COVID-19” had similar results, finding that people with more exposure to children became ill at a lower rate than the general population. “These findings are not well explained by age, gender or BMI distribution of those patients and should be validated in other settings.”

An article published in the Washington Post on Wednesday with the headline “Feared coronavirus outbreaks in schools yet to arrive, early data show,” appeared to align with the findings of the Scottish study.

“Everyone had a fear there would be explosive outbreaks of transmission in the schools. In colleges, there have been. We have to say that, to date, we have not seen those in the younger kids, and that is a really important observation,” Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, said in the article.

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